A virtual ‘walk’ through my ‘woodland’ garden

 

When I say ‘woodland’ garden what I really mean is my shady area of the garden where I grow lots of plants that would be happy on the edges of a woodland.  Like many other gardeners I tend to choose grandiose names of bits of my garden.  Obviously, sub-consciously I have a desire to have a bigger patch. When I say ‘walk’ what I really mean is standing on one spot and turning 180 degrees but that doesnt really sound very interesting!  Above is an Anenome that I bought last year though I cant remember its name.  It has bulked up well since this time last year and I am hoping it will spread in this area.  This corner of the garden is under the canopy of a number of my neighbours trees and also from a large Prunus tree in my garden.  The soil is a nightmare – thick clay so I have spent the last 3 years adding spent compost etc and it is finally paying off.  Next to the Anenome is an Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’,  I bought this at a plant fair last summer having read that it was ideal for damp shady areas.  It wasnt too bad but didnt live up to my expectations and then it disappeared – Oh no I thought not another plant I have bought only to kill off!  But no, it has started to re-emerge and it is looking loads better than it did last year.  I think it prefers the damp weather we have had this spring to the heat of last spring.

This is a grouping in my ‘woodland’ garden.  You can see hosta, Camellia, Acer, ferns and a Rhododenron.  Its a bit of a messy picture but I think it shows the textures that I am trying to bring together.

This Bleeding Heart is stilling much of the limelight at the moment.  I prefer the white flowers, on this occasion, to the normal pink version as they light up the corner, particularly in the early evening when the light is fading.  Also a good contrast with the Rhododenron in the background.

I believe this is a Tellima grandiflora. I had some seeds from my garden society several years ago labelled Heuchera and this is the result but I dont think it is a Heuchera at all.  It is particularly lovely now as the foilage is so fresh.  You will see it has flower spikes but they arent much, they just add a little height for a while.  In the autumn the foilage turns to a bronzey colour though not as spectacular as I would like.  It is very free with its seed and the 3 plants I grew have now spread throughout the garden. 

Well that was my ‘woodland’ garden I hope the walk wasnt too tiring!

6 Comments on “A virtual ‘walk’ through my ‘woodland’ garden

  1. Delightful – lovely textures – I particularly like the Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’
    I enjoyed my walk through your woodland garden
    Warm Regards
    Karen

  2. I am glad I am not the only one who had a tiny woodland ‘patch’. Shade is usually written about as a problem area but I find I like more shade plants than sun loving ones, shade plants ofen have more contrast in leave and look better together. The Sunny areas are my problems!

    Best wishes Sylvia (England)

  3. Oh, goodness, now I’m envious. I’ve just started work on my ‘woodland garden,” grandiose title for a weedy corner in the shade. Well, yours just shows what can be achieved, although our summers are too hot for lot of your charmers.

  4. I just love this post and this part in particular: “When I say ‘woodland’ garden what I really mean is my shady area of the garden where I grow lots of plants that would be happy on the edges of a woodland. Like many other gardeners I tend to choose grandiose names of bits of my garden. Obviously, sub-consciously I have a desire to have a bigger patch. When I say ‘walk’ what I really mean is standing on one spot and turning 180 degrees but that doesnt really sound very interesting!” I love it! And could have written it myself. Thanks so much for visiting my blog.

  5. I’m glad you all enjoyed your ‘walk’ I totally agree with Sylvia that shade isnt a problem area, there are lots of amazing plants for this type of situation.

  6. I have the same mystery plant in my shady garden. I also noticed something similar growing wild in the woods here in Seattle. I will look up Tellima. Thanks.
    Jean (Pill Bug)

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