My Garden This Weekend – 7th September 2014

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Autumn and the season of bounty is definitely upon us.  My step over apples have generous crops of apples considering how small the trees are; not bad for their third year.

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I finished off my period of annual leave by replanting the Cottage Border along the top of 2014_09070001the wall.  Last weekend I lifted everything aside from the roses and sage, potted it up although I threw a few plants.  Then I set out off the plants I had accumulated over the past couple of weeks along with the plants that were going back in the border.  I have adopted a pink, grey, burgundy/purple theme for the border with the grey and burgundy coming primarily from foliage.  The colour palette comes from the spring blossom of the step over apples which back the border and the flowers of the Abelia at the beginning of the border which is a key view of the border.

2014_09070003I struggle with getting the maximum impact from my borders and have taken various approaches over the years including mixed season interest and a key season of interest.  Neither approach has really worked as the borders have looked dull for too much of the year.  Therefore I am trying a different approach influenced from reading Christopher Lloyd and Margery Fish.  I am trying to have good structure with foliage interest and then having flowers to supplement this with hopefully interest at different times of the year.  I probably haven’t explained myself very well but I feel I have a plan in my head! The border planting is fairly restricted too, another part of the plan, and features sedums, stachys, roses, aquilegia, pink Japanese anemones, and geraniums.  One of my sons has suggested that I add some alliums to continue the purple theme in late spring and I think this is a good idea.

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Pleased with how the Cottage Border, which I am renaming the Rose Border due to the number of roses included, has gone I have moved on to the Big Border.

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The Big Border has always meant to have a late summer season of interest but is somewhat lacking at the moment.  There are a number of asters in the border which are still in tight bud so I am probably being unfair but I have felt that it needed zinging up and in particular the area nearest the steps.  As this is a particularly sunny spot of the garden I have planted quite a few bulbous summer plants here and the foliage has become very samey.  So this weekend I have really weeded this end of the border, removed a couple of poor kniphofia and a horrid pink sanguisorba – you can see how much space has been freed up. To this and along the far side of the border I have planted out the asters I bought from Pictons.  2014_09070019Anna asked which asters I bought from Pictons so just for her here is a list of my purchases:

Aster ericodes f. prostrate ‘Snow Flurry’
Aster trinervius ‘Stardust’
Aster lateriflorus var. horizontalis ‘Prince’
Aster pringeli ‘Monte Cassino’
Aster x frikartii ‘Wunder von Staffa’
Aster linosyris

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I’m also really pleased with this combination – Crocosmia ‘Emily Mackenzie’ alongside the autumn foliage of Hamamelis mollis ‘Arnold Promise’; there is also an orange flowered Geum tucked in further back in this border which I hope will bulk up and add to the colour. This combination is at the end of the path which goes in front of the Rose Border and like the way it acts as a focal point as you walk along the path.

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Finally I have been busy in the evenings repotting my bulb collection.  I still have lots more to do and am having to work out a new plan to accommodate everything that needs overwintering this winter given that I don’t plan to have the greenhouse particularly warm.  Mum’s mini greenhouse which she had decided to get rid of should help with this though and is probably going to become home for my non-bulbous alpines.

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So lots achieved despite the odds and the plans I have been forming in my mind over the summer are starting to come together.  The tree surgeon has been instructed to deal with the huge willow and I am waiting to see how this impacts on the light in the top half of the garden before move forward there.  I have though decided to not buy any more seeds. I love sowing seeds but never had enough time to look after the seedlings and this frustrates me.  I am someone who if they are going to do something they want to do it well so no more seed sowing; well not until such time as I have more space or time.  This should take some self-imposed pressure off me and allow me time to explore my new fascination – embroidery which is the subject of my other blog!

 

 

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10 Comments Add yours

  1. Your garden is such fun and so inviting. I love the contrast and texture you have created in your plant selections.

  2. rusty duck says:

    I really like what you’ve done with the Cottage/Rose border Helen. Restricting the range of plants should give more impact. Even though I know I shouldn’t I still tend to buy one of everything and am always disappointed by the spotty effect that results. I thought my witch hazel was colouring up early, but I’ve now seen a couple of others today looking resplendent in autumn foliage.

  3. Yvonne Ryan says:

    Looking good! Hope you had a sit and look at also!

  4. bittster says:

    I’ve never noticed the apples there at the back of the border. They look wonderful! Do you spray? The fruits look so perfect.
    I’m envious of your energy for gardening at this time of year. I have trouble getting off the lawnchair while the thermometer is still up 🙂

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi bittster
      I don’t use chemicals or sprays not for any environmental reasons but originally due to a lack of funds now the garden seems to be balanced and I only resort to slug pellets

  5. Alison says:

    That is a great list of asters, will be great to see them develop.

  6. Cathy says:

    The borders look as if they really taking shape – and well done for ousting ‘horrid’ things!! I have bravely resisted the temptation to buy more asters this year as there is no sign of the few I put in last year… grrr!

  7. Anna says:

    Oh those apples look most delicious Helen. I do like the Emily & Arnold pairing. Seed sowing and then all that comes with is so time consuming so a wise decision if you have the willpower to resist. Thanks for the low down on your aster purchases 🙂

  8. Run A Muck Ranch says:

    Beautiful!

  9. Finella says:

    Your garden looks amazing.

Please feel free to leave comments as its always lovely to get feedback. I try to respond to comments as much as possible but sometimes life and work get in the way but I will do my best to respond especially if your comment is a question.

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