Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – April 2015

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The last couple of weeks have given us the occasional bright sunny days with temperatures just nudging 20C.  It seems like the garden has had its touch-paper lit and the plants are rushing forward.  Every day there seems to be something new opening or germinating.  Today’s thrill is the first Anemone pavonina opening its flower.  I bought three plants last year from Stocktonbury Gardens, taking great care where I planted them and carefully not removing the seed heads so they might self-seed.  They can be hard to establish so I was grateful for the mild winter and the fact that all three have reappeared and have flower buds.

 

Narcissus Angels Tears
Narcissus Angels Tears
Narcissus Sophies Choice
Narcissus Sophies Choice

There is still quite a variety of narcissus large and small flowering in the garden but my two favourites are Angels Tears and Sophies Choice, both quite elegant and pale.

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Tulips are rare in my garden as over recent hard winters they have been dug up by the badger so I no longer plant them in the borders.  However, there are one or two which the badger didn’t get and which flower year on year.  Tulip ‘Jan Reus’ is one of the few flowering in my garden at the moment.

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Iris bucharica is another new delight.  It’s a Juno Iris which aren’t generally easy to grow in the garden, prefering pot culture, but Iris bucharica is the exception and will grow in the border so here’s hoping that they will reappear next year.

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I had forgotten I had Leucojum vernum in the woodland border so it was a delight to see it reappear.  Hopefully one day it will start to bulk up.

Epimedium Black Sea
Epimedium Black Sea
Epimedium Rose Queen
Epimedium Rose Queen
Epimedium x warleyense 'Orangekonigin'
Epimedium x warleyense ‘Orangekonigin’

I have a growing passion for Epimediums and the first are flowering with more to follow.  I love their dainty flowers and the way they waft above the foliage.

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Another new tiny delight is Dicentra cucullaria which I have started in a pot but I think will be fine in the border once I have looked up the right conditions for it.

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The honesty has started to flower.  I think this one is Lunaria ‘Corfu Blue’; I remember  sowing seeds for it but I don’t remember it germinating well but maybe I was too hasty in throwing the seed tray on to the border.

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I do though remember sowing Lunaria annua ‘Chedglow’.  I bought the seeds last year from Avon Bulbs at Malvern show, sowing them that weekend and I am very pleased with the plants.  I really like the dark foliage with the purple flowers.

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Primulas and polyanthus are flowering away with new ones putting in an appearance on a regular basis.  It seems that the polyanthus start flowering later than the primulas. I am particularly fond of the (Drumstick Primula)

There are lots of other small floral delights in the borders and I have included a few of my real favourites.

Omphalodes cherry ingram
Omphalodes cherry ingram
Anemone nemorosa 'Westwell Pink'
Anemone nemorosa ‘Westwell Pink’
Anemone Lipsiensis
Anemone Lipsiensis
Bergenia 'Bressingham White
Bergenia ‘Bressingham White
Sweet Cicely
Sweet Cicely

For more Garden Blogger Bloom Day posts visit Carol over at May Dreams

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31 Comments Add yours

  1. As always Helen mouthwatering pictures of your plants. I’m particularly interested in the picture of Honesty ‘Corfu Blue’ as I have a nice stand of it in the garden from seed collected and brought back from Corfu 2 years ago and sown last spring. The first flowers opened in January and all plants are now in full flower.I have more seed to sow which was collected last July from the same place. I like the look of your Lunaria annua ‘Chedglow’,I must keep an eye open for it in seed lists.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Sue
      Chedglow is available from Avon Blubs as seeds. I think they might have bred it

  2. rusty duck says:

    Wow, Anemone pavonina is gorgeous. I’d given up on tulips too, mice in place of badgers, but I too have a survivor. I share your love of epimediums and find it very hard to resist when I come across a new one. But I must must must find an Omphalodes. What a beautiful shade of blue.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Jessica
      the omphalodes is a wonderful blue. I’m glad it’s not just me that struggles with tulips

  3. bushbernie says:

    Your garden is springing to life with such a wonderful variety of plants. I just love those Narcissus Angel Tears and Epimediums, plants I would never see here. Your borders must look lovely.

  4. Great post! I love the recurved petals on some of the Narcissus. I always wanted to try some of the Epimedium, too. You take very good photos!

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi BR
      Thank you, do try epimediums they are a delight

  5. Pauline says:

    Your Narcissus Angels Tears is so pretty as is your Iris bucharia. I was surprised to see that you Leicojum is still flowering, mine was over a long time ago. Epimedium are a favourite of mine too, they have such dainty little flowers, beautiful!

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Pauline
      My leucojum hasn’t been flowering long but I have quite a few plants that seem to be behind other people’s. Maybe it is cooler here

  6. hillwards says:

    So far I seem to have lost two epimediums here, sadly. Yours are very pretty. Lots of lovely bloomsall over your garden! I planted anemone lipsiensis corms but they never came up either, so rather envious of yours, such a lovely buttery yellow.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Sarah
      You need to find out if your epimedium is an acid lover or whether it is a clump former which would do ok in dry shade. There are some Chinese varieties which don’t do dry shade. You also need to plant them deep.

    2. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Sarah
      Also I find Anemones establish better if they are planted in the green rather than as corms, in my opinion

  7. Yes, there’s a real sense of acceleration there!
    I never thought of badgers as Eaters of Tulips..

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Rachel
      Badgers adored tulips. They dig up the bulbs and half eat them. I have given up

  8. There is so much happening in your garden! The Epimedium are particularly lovely; and the Dicentra is very special. Happy GBBD to you!

  9. Beautiful. I did not know Bergenia are so beautiful flowers. Omphalodes cherry ingram is also a new plant to me, very pretty. Daffs are only bulbous plant which are perennial in my hot climate. Great blog as always.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Muhammad
      I’m glad you like the blog. I think the White bergenia is much nicer than some of the bright pink flowered varieties

  10. My little Dicentra flew into the garden from my neighbor’s. I now have it in damp shade and quite a sunny spot as well. I think you should be able to find the right place in your garden — which is really looking lovely these days.

  11. Lea says:

    Wow! What a lot of beautiful blooms!
    Happy Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day!
    Lea

  12. Your spring garden is lovely with its abundance of blooms. Happy spring and Happy GBBD!

  13. Cathy says:

    Angel Tears is indeed gorgeous, and thanks for showing us those epimediums…

  14. Kathy Sturr says:

    Oh, so much candy! I’m drooling. I love Angels Tears. I love epimediums, too, and have one – it made it through last winter but did it make it through this one? I’m almost afraid to look under the leaves. I wish my primroses would take off. They seem to struggle. Maybe too much light – we lost another neighboring tree. On the other hand, the Pagoda dogwood I planted has really taken off – shade soon.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Kathy
      I suspect the primroses need a bit of shade and mositure. Hope your epimedium is ok

  15. Anna says:

    Narcissus ‘Angel’s Tears’ has gone straight onto the wish list Helen! My lunaria ‘Corfu Blue’ is still to flower – after seeing it on a couple of blogs recently I’m looking forward to seeing it in the flesh. I have ‘Chedglow’ in flower and am most relieved that the foliage is now all purple. The plants initially looked as they had a severe case of the measles

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Anna
      I have noticed that Chedglow had some blotches on the leaves but not as bad as measles. I’m not 100% convinced that Corfu blue is indeed that, someone told me it was that one but who knows.

  16. bettyl - NZ says:

    What a variety of wonderful spring colors! That angel tears flower is very intriguing and unusual.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Bettyl
      It is rather beautiful, this is the first year I have grown it but I will be getting more for next spring

  17. You have a fantastic diversity of colors in your garden. I love to see plants that are normally kept in pots planted out among the other bloomers. The iris are quite nice! Thanks for sharing your blooms.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi TM
      Thank you, I do like a bit of variety in the garden

  18. Juliet says:

    Ooooooh, I love Anemone Pavonina! It was on my wish-list for my last garden, but for some reason I couldn’t grow Anemones there, and I had completely forgotten about it. Thank you for reminding me – will now go and add it to wish-list for new garden!

Please feel free to leave comments as its always lovely to get feedback. I try to respond to comments as much as possible but sometimes life and work get in the way but I will do my best to respond especially if your comment is a question.

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