Emerging from the Elderberry

August
August

I am sure we all have bits of our garden that we really struggle with and to be honest turn a blind eye to.  I also bet that those areas are ones which are possibly in difficult to get to parts of the garden, or have difficult growing conditions.  My challenging spot is the top right hand corner, as you look from the house; it’s the corner behind the workshop.    As you can see from the photo above the corner suffers from the shade cast by my neighbour’s trees mainly the Elder which is right in the corner.  This has two large conifers, probably leylandii behind it which form part of the hedge along my neighbour’s back boundary.

IMG_3870

But having battled with the elder for years I was thrilled the other evening to get a visit from my neighbour asking if I minded them cutting back some of the branches on the maple to the front of the shed.  During the conversation she mentioned that the tree surgeons would be cutting down the elder and the two conifers.  I felt  a little bad later at how enthusiastic my reaction was; maybe saying ‘Oh good, I really struggle with that tree..’ is a little selfish! I was thrilled when I got home on Friday, just before the light faded, to see the transformation.  Not only had the tree surgeons done a very neat job with no debris on my side of the fence but the amount of light that is now flooding in on that side of the garden is amazing.  It isn’t only the light but the fact that the elder, in full leaf, created such a rain shadow at the top of the garden that I have struggled to grow anything.  As you can see there are three bamboos along the back fence.  The one to the left of the picture above is much taller than the others, in fact the third one has hardly put on any growth since it was planted some years ago and I am really hoping that with the increase in light and moisture the plant will start to thrive.  I am now revisit what plants I can use to plant around the bamboos and maybe I can now consider something more exciting than is presently there.

 

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10 Comments Add yours

  1. A major difference…Oh, how exciting! Can’t wait to see what you do plant there.

  2. Ah, now, surely this will revitalise the enthusiasm – there’s some experimenting to be done here!

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Rachel
      Indeed I will need to see how the soil improves but definitely room for something interesting

  3. A plot twist in this story, I am anxious to see what you do with this wonderful turn of fate.

  4. Søren says:

    Congratulations on your “new plot of garden”. It really is quite a change, and I imagine even this first season will see some more changes in that corner. Exciting!

  5. Renee says:

    That’s a great opportunity to experiment! how exciting!

  6. Brian Skeys says:

    Oh dear Helen looks like you are going to have to buy some new plants!
    I like the wicker owl.😀

  7. Cathy says:

    Oh that IS exciting – and quite possibly what you needed to revive the temporary lapse of interest in the garden…

  8. rusty duck says:

    I never fail to be surprised by just how must light returns when a tree goes. And the feeling of space. That corner is a huge opportunity now!

  9. All change! That is great news for your side of the fence, it’s so helpful when you have good neighbours.

Please feel free to leave comments as its always lovely to get feedback. I try to respond to comments as much as possible but sometimes life and work get in the way but I will do my best to respond especially if your comment is a question.

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