GBBD January 2018

Grevillea Canberra Gem

The first Garden Bloggers Bloom Day of the year sees a interesting selection of plants in flower, albeit a small choice selection. There are numerous buds a plenty – Hellebores, Eranthis, Snowdrops, Iris reticulata and Magnolia – but as with many a garden visit they will probably look lovely next week.

Grevillea victoriae

So what are we left to enjoy in the second full week of the year? Strangely, two Australian shrubs – Grevillea victoria and Grevillea Canberra Gem.  The former has been in flower since before Christmas and the latter has just started to open its flowers despite being covered for days in a thick crust of snow before Christmas. I’m not sure when Grevillea Canberra Gem is supposed to flower in the UK but mine is rarely without a few  flowers and beloved by the pollinators.

Euphorbia characias

Also in flower in the front garden are the Euphorbia characias.  I do love Euphorbias – wonderful structure, colour and such unusual flowers.

Galanthus ‘Selborne Green Tips’

Since my last post I have been reassured that the above is indeed Galanthus ‘Selborne Green Tips’ which is good to know.  Also joining Galanthus ‘Ding Dong’ and Galanthus ‘Mrs Macnamara’ is Galanthus ‘Colussus’ and Galanthus galantea.

Galanthus colussus
Galanthus galatea

Whilst the woodland border is speckled with hellebore buds there is one already in flower, a reliable early flowerer, and one of the first ones I bought from Ashwoods.

Primula taygetos

Finally I thought I would share this Primula which has been flowering since November and is now just waiting for a home in the garden rather than languishing on the patio.

Thank you to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting this meme which is a wonderful way of recording what is in flower each month.

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12 Comments Add yours

  1. I was astonished when Halifax filled its Christmas planters in the centre of town with primulas. They feel as if they ought to be spring flowers but they can be almost as year round as gorse.
    I brought snowdrops in a pot with me from Dorset but they don’t seem to be doing anything.

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Lucy
      I think Snowdrops can sulk for a little bit – I’m sure they will be back. I know I have bought them in the past and planted them and thought they were lost and then they reappeared two years later.

    2. That’s good advice because I was thinking of tipping them out and using the pot for something else. Pots which appear to have nothing but earth in can be uninspiring – but I would be sad to lose them because they are sort of a memento of ‘home’.

  2. Maybe the Grevilleas are the Australian equivalent of gorse – in flower all the time (after a fashion).

  3. susurrus says:

    These lovely pictures make me feel spring is on its way. We were at Bodnant a few days ago and, though there was plenty to see, the amount of hellebore buds made me wish we’d been a couple of weeks later.

    I have two Ashwood Nursery hellebores in large pots. While I was travelling, slugs ate one completely down to the soil. I hope it will recover but there are no signs yet.

  4. Lovely Galanthus!
    Happy Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day!

  5. Pullingweeds says:

    I’ve admired Grevilleas in Australia, but only recently discovered that they will grow in our climate. I guess you have to choose the variety carefully. Your Canberra Gem is gorgeous – I wonder if I can find a space…

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Canberra gem is the hardiest and the one generally grown outside. victoria has done Ok on my Midlands garden so far but hasn’t had to go through a hard or very wet winter yet. As far as I’m aware those are the only two varieties that will survive outside here

  6. rusty duck says:

    I’m very tempted to try a Grevillea. Apparently hardy down to -10C which shouldn’t be an issue if I can find a well drained spot. That might be an issue!

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      My Canberra Gem (which is huge) grows in clay based soil which has been improved and there is a birch and laurel hedge adjacent so I suppose they help soak up moisture. It has come through the hard winters a few years back to -18 for a few days but was well established by then and I expect the size of the shrub protected the roots.

  7. bittster says:

    A few treasures for sure, so nice to see them at this time of year while we are staring at ice and snow!
    I’m glad you’re back in the garden again, your posts always hold something new. Thanks.

  8. Cathy says:

    Those grevillias must indeed be a welcome splash of colour – Canberra Gem looks gorgeous. Glad to see your snowdrops are settling down. Mine are all in lattice pots in my special snowdrop border but if there is no sign of them appearing by the end of January I do lift the pots and check whether there are any bulbs left in them, which sadly proves not to be the case in a few instances each year 😦

Please feel free to leave comments as its always lovely to get feedback. I try to respond to comments as much as possible but sometimes life and work get in the way but I will do my best to respond especially if your comment is a question.

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