Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – Jan 2019

Euphorbia rigida

When I went out to take the photos for this blog post I was surprised at how much was in flower dotted around the garden.  I have already posted this week about the snowdrops but they aren’t alone in bring dashes of colour to the borders. In the front garden the star is the Euphorbia rigida – its my favourite Euphorbia, well probably.  I love its acid yellow flowers against the glaucous leaves.

The first hellebores are already in flower and definitely a few weeks ahead of previous years probably due to the warmer weather.  They do seem a little washed out in their colour this year but that’s probably just my imagination.

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’

The Witch Hazel (Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’) has just started flowering and there are definitely fewer flowers than last year.  I suspect this is because it was so dry and witch hazels really benefit from moisture in the summer to help them form flowers.  I did water it from time to time but obviously not enough for a stunning display.

Jasminum nudiflorum

I’m quite pleased with the photo of the winter jasmine as my photos always seem to be out of focus due to the smallness of the flowers.  However, as there are so many flowers this year a photo showing more of the plant has proved to be quite interesting.  I know lots of people don’t like this plant but I cut it back very hard each year and this keeps it in check and not too woody.

Rosemary is at its best at the moment, covered in dainty lilac flowers and the odd pollinator looking for food.

Eranthis hyemalis

As well as the snowdrops, the Eranthis hyemalis  are starting to flower.  I do love these little bursts of sunshine in the border.

Iris unguicularis ‘Walter Butt’

The other gem in the border is the Iris unguicularis ‘Walter Butt’ which is fragile tissue like petals which seem to disappear as fast as they appear due to the wind and rain we have had recently.

Primula palinuri

Primila palinuri is something of a miracle.  I grew this plant from seed some years back and it has lived in a pot wintering in the greenhouse. However, with my new approach to the garden I decided back in the Autumn to risk planting it out as the plant never looked that well and I thought it might benefit from the move.  Primula palinuri grows in a rocky location in South Italy so I decided that it could probably withstand low temperatures if it had good drainage.  Despite the yellowing around the older leaves it is already looking at lot healthier and I love the farina on the flower which I’m sure it didn’t have in the greenhouse. Having just looked it up to ensure I spelt the name right I have discovered that it is on the Red Threatened List in its native South Italy so now I am concerned I planted it out!

For more Garden Bloggers Bloom Day posts check out Carol’s blog May Dreams.

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7 Comments Add yours

  1. tonytomeo says:

    I am sorry that I needed to dismiss myself from Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. I just have too much difficulty keeping up. I might do it again as things mellow out here a bit. That iris is rad. The species is one that I have not grown, although I have seen other cultivars about. I happen to dig iris. I also dig the hamamelis because we used to grow it in the mid 1990s. It was discontinued because there is such a limited market for it here.

  2. Wow! You have a lot in flower already. Those Hellebores look lovely to me! Every year I think about extending my collection (of two!) but I worry it might become dangerous…

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      if you wait long enough and dont weed too much around them, your two will soon become more!!

  3. Beautiful Hellebores! And I was surprised to see an Iris that blooms in the winter.
    Happy Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day!

    1. Helen Johnstone says:

      Hi Lea
      That iris is a winter flowering one, there are a number of varieties. Its a good doer for the winter garden. Quite compact and the flowers are close to the ground so a front of the border plant.

  4. Could you collect seed or divide your endangered Italian plant, especially if it seems to prefer being outside to being in the greenhouse?

  5. Cathy says:

    Your hellebores are clumping up nicely, Helen – I think mine could do with a bit of compost to give them a boost as many of them have looked a little jaded in recent years. Interestingly, my witch hazels have all got more buds than in recent years, and I didn’t make a special effort to water them apart from my expensive new one – and yet I too would have expected the dry summer to affect them badly

Please feel free to leave comments as its always lovely to get feedback. I try to respond to comments as much as possible but sometimes life and work get in the way but I will do my best to respond especially if your comment is a question.

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