Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – May 2020

It’s been a while since I posted a Garden Bloggers Bloom Day (GBBD) post but with my renewed blogging and a sunny morning I thought I would post away.

My approach is slightly different to my previous approach.  I have always taken close up photos of flowers especially for this meme but today I have pulled back a bit so you can see the context the plant is growing in, this is purely because my plants have matured and I am rather pleased with some of the combinations.

I’m starting in the front garden with the mad Euphorbia characias which is collapsing all over the place at the moment.  I adore the chartreuse green of the flower heads and it creates a perfect foil for both the aquilegias (above) and Iris Langport Wren (below).

Also in the front garden is one of my climbing roses.  I’m fairly new to climbing roses as the paving around the house was put by the builders right up to the walls so I have to grow the roses in large containers and only realised this was possible a few years ago, having read that roses didn’t do well in pots.  I do like the way that the orange red flowers of the rose work with the bricks.

Another pleasing combination is the wild yellow flag iris which grows in the small bog garden with the flowers emerging through some self-sown bracken (just as I was thinking the bracken really needed to go).

I’m also enjoying the allium flowers which are growing through the sage and contrasting with the sage flowers.  I can’t claim this is a deliberate planting its more a case of the alliums sowing themselves around and finding much better companions that I would give them.

Last up this month is Lathyrus aureus which I love at this time of year.  I really enjoy the orange flowers which like the Euphorbia provide a good compliment to the purples and blues of the aquilegias and irises.

For more GBBD posts check out the links on Carol’s May Dream blog

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – Feb 2019

My selection of blooms for February include a lot of flowers that were flowering last month.  It seems to me that spring flowers last longer than those in the summer.  I wonder if it is something to do with the temperatures or whether they flower longer to give them more chance of being pollinated by the pollinators which are scarcer than in the summer.

 

 

 

 

 

A couple of clamps of Eranthis which are slowly clumping up.  I did have Eranthis schwefelglanz which is a pale Eranthis but I haven’t spotted it so far which is disappointing.

Narcissus ‘February Gold’

My first daffodils or narcissus are flowering – Narcissus ‘February Gold’. I planted these bulbs back in the Autumn in a new area where the compost bins were previously.  The flowers are more delicate than I anticipated and I am really pleased with how they look, I will definitely be adding more next year.

Iris unguicularis ‘Walter Butt’

Probably the last bloom on the Iris ungicularis looking a little chewed but still providing a welcome splash of colour at this time of year.

One of the many clumps of snowdrops around the garden.  I am really pleased with how big the clumps are now; I will probably do a little splitting of clumps in a month or so once the flowers have finished.

Galanthus ‘Wendys Gold’

One of my more specialist snowdrops – Galanthus ‘Wendys Gold’ – different because of the gold ovaries and markings on the inner petals.

And a selection of my favourite hellebores

A hellebore seedling

Hellebore Anna’s Red 

So these are the floral highlights from my garden.

For more garden bloggers blooms check out May Dream Gardens, where Carol kindly hosts this meme.

 

 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – Sept 2018

Tithonia

The Tithonia are the stars of the Big Border at the moment.  I am really pleased with them having grown them from seed.  They were planting out just before the heat wave and then just sat there until the heatwave broke.  They have quickly put on growth and are now flowering their socks off.  I may just grow them again next year.

I’m also really pleased with the Knipofia ‘Popsicle’ which were added this year.  They are now on their second batch of flowers which is a real bonus and not a feature of my other Knipofia.

I am also incredibly thrilled with this Nerine.  I don’t know its name but the colour is so vibrant and fabulous.

The Japanese Anemones are as reliable as ever and provide a nice elegant backdrop to the rest of the plants.

But it’s not all fabulous, the Kirengeshoma palmata have suffered this year.  The leaves have crispy edges and the flowers have been very slow in opening and appear washed out compared to previous year.

I do like this aster but for the life of me I can’t remember its name or even buying it.  If anyone can identify it I would be grateful.

Coming back to the orange theme the Grevillea victoriae has just started to flower which is good news as it shows the shrub is doing well.  It has started to really shot now and the flowers are finally higher up the plant than previously when they seemed to be hugging the ground.

Thalictrum delavayi was a surprise to find at the back of the woodland border, it seems very late to me but I’m not complaining.

And to end I thought I would include a few more bulbs as I do love bulbs. So here are two Tulbaghia; the one above is Tulbaghia violacea ‘Alba’ and the one below is an unknown Tulbaghia bought from a plant sale a while ago.

I hope you enjoyed my floral highlights for September.  If you are Glen over at Drillgardens.com I hope you don’t decide to steal this post like you did last months – we shall see.

thanks as ever to Carol at May Dreams for hosting this lovely meme.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – July 2018

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

When I started taking photos in the garden this morning it didn’t feel as though there was a lot in flower.  My garden feels like it is in a bit of a lull between early summer and late summer which I am sure the lack of rain for the last month hasn’t helped.

Unknown Crocosmia

The roses and geraniums are over, although many of the roses are building up for a second flush, and now we are moving into the stronger colours of the crocosmia, agapanthus, asters, kniphofia and rudbeckia; but we aren’t quite there yet.

The number of agapanthus in my garden are slowly growing.  They are all planted out in the borders, apart from the white one above which is in a pot..  I have to admit that I’m not sure about the varieties as I have had some of them for years.  Most of them are in the big border which is the sunny past of the garden and relatively free draining plus the slope helps avoid them becoming too water logged over winter.  One of the benefits of my neighbours removing all the trees along the fence line is that my agapanthus now grow more upright.

Allium sphaerocephalon

Bulbs as probably my favourite plant group and the big border is home to all sorts which bring colour throughout the year.  I am particularly fond of alliums and have one variety or another flowering throughout late spring to late summer.  Allium sphaerocephalon is actually in the front garden and is left over from when I had borders and a lawn.  It pops up here and there with its long stems and pointy flower heads which waft around in the breeze.  These two are intent on being together, no matter how many times I untangled them for their photo.

I’m not a huge fan of Phlox, I find them a little fussy and their big flower heads feel a little incongruous with the rest of the plants in the garden.  However, this is Phlox paniculata ‘David’ which has the most heavenly scent.  I bought it a number of years back from Wollerton Old Hall and the scent was so strong on the way home it was almost intoxicating.  Sadly whilst it reappears dutifully each year it is very slow to bulk up.

Having said I’m not mad on the big flower heads of the Phlox I do like Hydrangeas, although it’s the dry flower heads that I have a real weakness for.  This hydrangea lives in a large pot on the patio and is flowering its socks off yet again this year.

Kangaroo Paw (Angiozanthos’
Kangaroo Paw (Angiozanthos)

Also on the patio are two large pots of Kangaroo Paw (Angiozanthos) which I am hugely proud of having grown them from seed some years back, so you have two photos so I can show off.  This is the third year they have flowered – I just love the strangeness of them.

Aloe striatula var. caesia

I also love the flowers of the Aloe striatula var. caesia which I bought probably 4 years ago.  It has come through a number of very old winters here outside planted in the ground.  The only thing I do to protect it is to cover it with fleece if a long period of cold is forecast.  It grows in a narrow border along the front of the house in full sun.  The border is predominantly gravel and builders rubble which helps with the drainage allowing me to grow a few more exotic looking plants.

Finally a trio of perennials which are adding a little sparkle ahead of the main late summer display.

Agastache ‘Black Adder’
Kniphofia ‘Toffee Nosed’
Digitalis ferruginea ‘Rusty Foxglove’

Thank you to Carol over at May Dreams for hosting this meme, which may well be the longest running garden related meme.

 

GBBD May 2018

Sweet Cicely

Whilst I was away having a jolly time in Austin the garden was busy getting on with life and a new cast was waiting to surprise me.

The first Aquilegia flowers definitely signify the imminent arrival of summer. Sadly over the years the number of long spurred Aquilegias seem to have diminished, something I must redress as they are my favourite.

The Camassias peaked but are still just about holding their own. They will soon be joined by the Alliums and Dutch Iris.

I realised when I was wandering round the garden that a lot of the blooms this month were from shrubs; I hadn’t realised I had so many shrubs.

Lathyrus aureus

On a smaller scale I’m really enjoying the orange flowers of Lathyrus aureus and Maianthemum racemosum

Maianthemum racemosum

Thank you to Carol, who I was delighted to meet for the first time last week, for hosting this monthly meme.

 

Its all about the hellebores – GBBD March ’18

This month we have moved on from snowdrops to the hellebores, although the snowdrops are still just there in the background as if frozen in time due to the cold snap.

I love hellebores, they are one of my many weakness.  I love their nodding demure heads which only reveal their real beauty when you lift them upwards.

I have quite a selection accumulated over the years, normally adding at least one a year, bought from Ashwood Nurseries, so they are all Ashwood hybrids.  They are slowly bulking up and merrily seeding around the garden.

But it’s not all hellebores and snowdrops flowering in the garden.  They are now being joined by crocus, hammelias, and violas which have been flowering since October.

Crocus Pickwick
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise

So these are my floral delights for March.  Thank you to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting this wonderful meme.

GBBD January 2018

Grevillea Canberra Gem

The first Garden Bloggers Bloom Day of the year sees a interesting selection of plants in flower, albeit a small choice selection. There are numerous buds a plenty – Hellebores, Eranthis, Snowdrops, Iris reticulata and Magnolia – but as with many a garden visit they will probably look lovely next week.

Grevillea victoriae

So what are we left to enjoy in the second full week of the year? Strangely, two Australian shrubs – Grevillea victoria and Grevillea Canberra Gem.  The former has been in flower since before Christmas and the latter has just started to open its flowers despite being covered for days in a thick crust of snow before Christmas. I’m not sure when Grevillea Canberra Gem is supposed to flower in the UK but mine is rarely without a few  flowers and beloved by the pollinators.

Euphorbia characias

Also in flower in the front garden are the Euphorbia characias.  I do love Euphorbias – wonderful structure, colour and such unusual flowers.

Galanthus ‘Selborne Green Tips’

Since my last post I have been reassured that the above is indeed Galanthus ‘Selborne Green Tips’ which is good to know.  Also joining Galanthus ‘Ding Dong’ and Galanthus ‘Mrs Macnamara’ is Galanthus ‘Colussus’ and Galanthus galantea.

Galanthus colussus
Galanthus galatea

Whilst the woodland border is speckled with hellebore buds there is one already in flower, a reliable early flowerer, and one of the first ones I bought from Ashwoods.

Primula taygetos

Finally I thought I would share this Primula which has been flowering since November and is now just waiting for a home in the garden rather than languishing on the patio.

Thank you to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting this meme which is a wonderful way of recording what is in flower each month.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day: April 2017

Dicentra spectablis ‘Valentine’

I have finally got my act together and am joining in with the Garden Bloggers Bloom Day meme for the first time in 2017. I thought I would start with Dicentra spectablis ‘Valentine’ as I moved it last Autumn, from a position where it was hidden and sad, and it has rewarded me with some wonderful blooms.

I featured my new tulips in my last post.  This is a lone tulip which has appeared in one of the borders and is a stray from a previous year.  I am rather pleased with the feathering on the petals which have shown up well in this photo.

Lunaria annua

The honesty (lunaria annua) is so tall this year, I suspect because of the additional light in the garden.  Over the years I have grown a number of different ones included white and purple and those with variegated leaves – the result is a random selection of white and purple variegated leaves and different shades of purple flowers.

Sweet violets, are wild flowers, which pop up around the garden of their own accord, I have never planted them; such a wonderful blue.

Bluebells appear around the boundary of my garden.  They are from a small clump I bought from my parents’ garden when we moved here and I have now got to the point where I am dig them up and removing them as they are so prolific.

Omphalodes cappadocica ‘Cherry Ingram’

I can never remember the name of this plant except it is named after Collingwood ‘Cherry’ Ingram – the cherry reflecting his passion for Japanese flowering cherries.  So every year I have to google Cherry Ingram to find the proper name of the plant.  This year it is looking better than it has ever looked – much healthier and floriferous.

Camassia

The garden is moving into its blue phase not just because of the bluebells and forget-me-nots but also, and probably mainly, because the Big Border is full of Camassias which are just coming into flower.  I can’t wait for them to all flower as it should be quite beautiful.

The first Rhododendron is flowering.  I have always had a fondness for rhododendrons as they remind me of my childhood and visiting Saville Gardens, near Windsor, not far from where I grew up.  Looking at the photograph the leaves look a little unhealthy so I will have to look into that.

The yellow of the daffodils is now being replaced by the yellow of primulas and also auriculas.  I have quite a few auriculas grown from seed but they are all the same colour as above despite the packet, a few years back now, saying they were mixed.  I have them growing in a row of terracotta pots along the top of the wall where I can see them from the kitchen and they are very cheering first thing in the morning.

There is also lime yellow coming from the Bupleurum longifolium which I think I might have managed to establish at last in the garden after many attempts.

Thank you to Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting this meme which brings so many of the garden blogging community together every month on the 15th.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – September 2016

 

Grevillea victoriae
Grevillea victoriae

I’ve decided not to focus on the asters this month but to showcase four plants which have just started to flower and whose flowers I am always thrilled to see.  They all need to be sought out in the garden as they can be a little shy.

First up is Grevillea victoriae which has wonderful exotic orange flowers. Similar to Grevillea ‘Canberra Gem’ but flowering later.  Last year I thought it hadn’t flowered but discovered all the flowers at the bottom of the shrub.  This year the shrub is a year older and has been moved into a sunnier location and the flowers are beginning to appear higher on the shrub so I am hoping that next year it will look amazing.

Unknown Nerine
Unknown Nerine

I have started to extend the bulb season in my garden with the inclusion of Nerines.  This is the first to flower and is from a hugh pot full of bulbs that I bought for a couple of pounds last year at the local HPS group.  I was really thrilled to see it, and its fellow flowers, as it shows that I have found a good location for it and confirms my plan to plant more Southern Hemisphere bulbs in this particular area.

Massonia
Massonia

I am always pleased when the Massonia flowers in the greenhouse.  I had a Massonia pustulata but I think I lost that and as its name indicates the leaves were quite blistered looking so its not that variety, maybe I will find the label one day but either way I am pleased it has flowered again.

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I have various Colchicums of differing quality and these are always the first to flower and are slowly but surely beginning to spread.  They are one of those plants whose flowers appear under the foliage of other plants but as you pass something catches you eye and you find yourself on your hands and knees looking to see what the colour is from.

So those are my 4 secret gems for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – for more GBBD posts visit Carol at May Dream Gardens

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – April 2016

Primula denticulata
Primula denticulata

The garden is sparkling with colour, lots of spots of colour much like an impressionist painting and I have to say that this is certainly my garden’s best season.  The colour and shimmer is created from lots of small flower heads in a myriad of pastel colours.  So for this month’s Garden Bloggers Bloom Day post I thought I would zoom in on my favourite flowers this week.

Narcissus Baths Flame
Narcissus Baths Flame

Alot of the colour comes from the various Narcissus which I add to every year.  This year’s new additions include Narcissus Baths Flame which I am rather taken with.  The petals are a buttery yellow, very soft when you compare them to the hard yellow of the obligatory large trumpet daffodils that you see in public planting.  The flowers glow as the light fades and I think that is because of the whiteness of the petals.

Narcissus Sailboat
Narcissus Sailboat

Narcissus Sailboat is another new addition and it definitely reinforces my preference for the paler narcissus; I do like the slightly yellow trumpet.

 

 

Narcissus Thalia
Narcissus Thalia

Narcissus Thalia is an almost pure white – very pure.

Narcissus Cheerfulness
Narcissus Cheerfulness

Narcissus ‘Cheerfulness’ is my favourite double narcissus, it has the most wonderful scent which you catch as you are weeding away in the border.  I prefer the single daffodils and I really dont like the blousey over breed narcissus which seem to popular at the moment.

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As the narcissus go over the tulips start but sadly I only have three tulips in the borders this year.  I haven’t planted them for a few years due to badger damage but these three have persisted year on year and are very pretty.  I have decided to risk them again next year as we haven’t had a visit from the badger for a couple of years now.

Imperial fritillary
Imperial fritillary

A lot less elegant than the narcissus is the Imperial fritillary.  This is the first year I have grown them and I am a little disappointed that the plants don’t seem to have developed a tall stem for the flowers as you would expect. I have two from different sources and both have done the same so maybe it is a result of the weather.

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I always forget the Leucojum vernum and are surprised when I first spot their nodding flowers thinking at first they are late snowdrops.  The clump has been planted for some years now and is expanding very slowly; maybe I will invest in some more and create a bit of a drift.

Anemone Bourdeux
Anemone Bordeaux

Anemone ‘Bordeaux’ is a very recent acquisition.  I was seduced by the almost velvet flowers which are working very well with the ageing flowers of Helleborus Anna’s Red and also Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’.  I really hope it reappears next year.

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Not all the colour is from bulbs or primulas as the blossom is beginning to appear.  This week Amelanchier decided to start flowering picking up the blossom of Prunus kojo-no-mai and will soon be joined by the large unknown Prunus that dominates the garden at this time.

Thank you to Carol over at May Dream Gardens for hosting this meme.