In a vase on Monday: Epimediums

This week’s vase is a simple one.  The ‘vase’ was made for me by my eldest son today.  It is essentially a log which he has carved out and filled with an old spice jar.  It is a prototype for something he is exploring doing for a friend’s wedding reception.

It seemed to me that the obvious flowers to put in the vase were epimediums which are so delicate that it is difficult to show them off well in a vase.  They really sparkle in the late afternoon summer and have brought a little bit of the remaining shady garden into the house.

Thank you to Cathy for hosting this weekly meme.

 

 

In a Vase on Monday: Yellow

I’ve never cut Forsythia for the house before and I really pleased I have chosen it for this week’s Monday Vase post.

My forsythia bush is to be pitied.  It grows right up against the fence and has struggled for years in the shadow of a large sycamore in my neighbour’s garden.  With their clearing of the boundary more light has flooded in and with the removal of the sycamore the competition for moisture has diminished. Just as the shrub is flexing its muscles with the improved environment so I too want it to grow and expand to soften the fence line and break up the view.  I remembered reading Christopher Lloyd, probably in the Well Tempered Gardener, saying that when you prune forsythia you shouldn’t prune it into a mound but you should remove the odd stem to keep the shrub within its boundaries.  This is the approach I decided to take as well as taking into account the lessons learnt last week at Ashwoods about thinning the canopy of shrubs.

The vase is a Poole pottery one bought from the local flea market a few years ago and this is the first time I have used it for flowers. For some reason I just thought the blue grey of the glaze would work with the yellow flowers.  I’m not 100% sure if I am right but I quite like the effect.

As for photographing the vase – well the fact that instead of the usual backdrop I have been using this year the vase is plonked on the dining room table demonstrates just how difficult it was to photograph the stems well. However, I think the simplicity of the setting fits the simplicity of the stems well.

Thank you Cathy for hosting this meme every week which is making me think a little laterally about what I can bring indoors.  Check our her blog for more Monday vase posts.

In A Vase on Monday – Camellia

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The vase this week is a simple one which doesn’t really require me to say much.  The camellia flower is from a small camellia I have growing in a pot.  It is a plant I rescued from one of those ‘bargain’ areas in a nursery and planted out in the garden.  However, it was apparently unhappy as the leaves were very yellow, despite me having another very healthy camellia near by.  So like many a good gardener before me I dug it up and put it in a pot with lots of ericaceous compost and I have been rewarded with healthy glossy leaves and half a dozen or so of these sumptuous pink blooms.

For more Monday vases visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden

In a vase on Monday: White Beauty

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Continuing with the stuck in the sofa theme of the last post my Vase On Monday isn’t a vase but a potted Hippeastrum.

I love Hippeastrums, or Amaryllis as we used to call them. They remind me of my aunt’s mother who always had a very tall leggy red one by her chair by the fire. They always had a knitting needle or two stuck in the post to support the flower heads with lengths of wool holding everything together.

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To be honest my supports haven’t progressed much. The knitting needles are now garden canes and the wool twine.

The cards are from my sons birthday on Valentines Day – not a great day to have a birthday if you want to go out for a family meal to celebrate.

Thank you Cathy for hosting this meme which I am trying, very hard, to do each week although I missed last weeks ☹️

 

In a Vase on Monday – Indecision

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This week was a real struggle so I almost didn’t bother to write this post but in life we have to go with the rough as well as the smooth so here’s this week’s vase.

I wanted to do something with my witch hazel but the flowers are only just opening and they are so tiny.  I also thought about snowdrops as I have quite a number now but that was last week’s theme so I think I should let at least one week pass with no snowdrops.  Instead I found a hellebore which was full of blooms opening and lots of buds to follow  so I decided to take three stems for the post.

What to put with them was the next struggle and I thought some woodlandy foliage would work well, so I  used some epimedium foliage and fern fronds to give a background and I took photos …

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…and then I thought No I really don’t like that its too fussy and not me at all.  So I ditched the foliage and the pink pashmina – too much pink and went for one of the random bottles I have in my cupboard.  As background I have gone for the grey velvety pashmina as I thought it was an interesting contrast to the second hand everyday bottle.

Anyway, there you go two for one – choose which you prefer!

For more Monday Vases pop over to Cathy’s.

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In a Vase on Monday – Granny’s Bonnets

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For this week’s vase I decided to feature aquilegias which as I said in my last post are a real favourite.  The aquilegias in the vase are the real Granny’s Bonnets, as in one of the common names for Aquilegia, as opposed to the long spurred aquilegias I showed in the GBBD post which I believe hail from the US.

But what foliage to use to show the flowers off?  I decided to go for some woodland plant foliage as after all aquilegias are woodland plants.  So in the vase with the Aquilegia is Bessia, Astible and Maianthemum. Finally to add a little height I added some sprigs of Tellima grandiflora; not a particularly interesting plant but the tiny pink tinged flowers work well with the pastels of the aquilegias.

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And the vase is the simple cheap glass one I have used before but I want to show case the delicate flowers.

For other Monday vases ramble over to Cathys at Rambling in the Garden